Saturday, December 9, 2017

Special Mothers Project support 10 years old Fredericka with APT Chair



The Special Mothers Project, an advocacy and awareness creation programme on cerebral palsy has donated a Tailor made chair  to 10 years old Fredericka who has cerebral palsy

The Appropriate Paper Technology (APT) Chair was given to Fredericka who has developed sclerosis and developing contractures due to poor posturing

APT equipment are made of paper and cardboard to help children with cerebral palsy with therapy

Fredericka trying her APT Chair
Ms Mabel Asare Mother of Fredericka who expressed gratitude on receiving the chair said: “I am no longer able to go for physiotherapy services; I have had two other children in addition to Fredericka, so I am forced to stay home. I can’t go out.”

Mabel expressed wishes for a community based rehabilitation centre where she could take her child or even a home based service at very affordable fee.

Mabel, a member of  the Special Mothers Project said she felt privileged when Mr Kenneth Nangai, a Ugandan based physiotherapist visited Ghana as part of  the Support Tools Enabling Parents (STEP) programme and visited her at home to give advise concerning her child.

Mrs Hannah Awadzi, Executive Director of the Special Mothers Project, an advocacy and awareness creation programme on cerebral palsy said the project is advocating the training of mothers as para-professionals to enable them manage their children with cerebral palsy effectively.

“Many mothers are no longer able to afford physiotherapy services at the hospital, many continue to lose hope in seeking help for their children with cerebral palsy,” she added

Sunday, November 26, 2017

Special Mothers Project donates to mother with four special needs children



The Special Mothers Project an advocacy and awareness creation programme on cerebral palsy has donated items and an unspecified amount of money to Ms Golda Nunoo, mother of four special needs children

The donation was done over the weekend to coincide with the meeting of the Special Mother group where members shared words of encouragement and demonstrated love towards Golda and her children.

Ms Nunoo, made an attempt to take her life and the life of three of her children when a neighbour slandered her that she had given birth to “mad children” but for the intervention of Ms Linda Clarke, a member of the Special Mothers group.

In response to the love shown her by the Special Mothers Group, Ms Nunoo said she believes it is well with her soul.

Mrs Hannah Awadzi, Executive Director of the Special Mothers Project who presented the items to Ms Nunoo said, society should look for ways to enhance the lives of parents of children with special needs

“These parents are already going through a  lot and the least we could do for them as a society is to show them love and kindness,” she said.

Mrs Awadzi called on government to implement policies that will enhance the lives of children with cerebral palsy and their families.

Saturday, November 25, 2017

Parents must play a lead role in managing children with Cerebral Palsy- Physiotherapist




Mr Kenneth Nangai, a Ugandan physiotherapist is advocating that parents of children with cerebral palsy must lead in the management of the disorder

He said that therapy is no longer straight jacket and should be fused into the daily routine of the child to ensure maximum results

“The practice where parents took their children with cerebral palsy to the hospital for therapy to be done for them no longer works, it does not take into consideration the parents well-being, we should look at new ways of rehabilitating children with cerebral palsy apart from taking them to the hospital,” he said.

Mr Nangai is in Ghana as part of programme called Support Tools Enabling Parents (STEP) that aims at improving the functionality and quality of life of children with cerebral through improved assessments and goal setting.

This project is funded by Liliane Foundation a Dutch organization that supports children and youngsters with disabilities who live in poverty to develop and use their talents with the aim of contributing to the quality of lives for children with cerebral palsy.

Mr Nangai who is being hosted by the Special Mothers Project, an advocacy and awareness creation programme on cerebral palsy in Ghana has interacted with over 40 parents and caregivers of children with cerebral palsy while advising them on what was practically possible for them to do with their children.

At a meeting with the parents of the Special Mothers Group, he said usually families raising children with cerebral palsy bear the biggest challenge of addressing the day to day needs of the child such as feeding, toilet training and general functional abilities.

Parents must therefore be empowered to work effectively to rehabilitate their children with cerebral palsy

“We should stop referring to children with cerebral palsy as being sick or patients, they are not sick, they are only limited in their functional abilities because of their condition and parents must be supported to play their role of improving their functionalities

Mrs Hannah Awadzi, Executive Director of the Special Mothers Project, said the programme serves as a platform to link families raising children with cerebral palsy to the limited services

“We try to put families in touch with help through our advocacy programme and we have facilitated the training of some mothers in various enterprises to enhance their lives.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

ICRF responds to the needs of families raising children with cerebral palsy



Impact Care Rehab Foundation (ICRF), an organization that provides a home for children with cerebral palsy at no cost has been opened at Kanda, a suburb of Accra.

Mrs Mildred Osei Asiamah, Chief Executive Officer of the Foundation said she was touched by the plight parents of children with cerebral palsy go through in trying to find a school for their children.

“I noticed that most crèches or day care centres do not accept children with cerebral palsy, I decided to start a foundation to help parents in this direction,” she said.

Mrs Osei-Asiamah said she got close to a child with cerebral palsy when her mother was sick and admitted at Korle Bu Teaching hospital.

“I love children so I decided to research more about cerebral palsy and see how I can support the child, in my research I realized that getting children with cerebral palsy into schools was a challenge for many parents so I decided to offer help in that direction.”

 ICRF operates a free day care centre which allows parents to bring their children with cerebral palsy in the morning and pick them up in the evening.

The Centre has a retired nurse and a physiotherapist that attends to the children as well as a professional team that cares for children between the ages of 1 and 5 years.

Mrs Osei-Asiamah said: “We want to afford the career parent the opportunity to work, school and follow their dreams without stress.”

The Foundation is also partnering the Special Mothers Project, an advocacy and awareness creation programme on cerebral palsy to ensure that they are providing the right services.

Mrs Hannah Awadzi, Executive Director of the Special Mothers Project, who expressed excitement at the services the centre is providing advised Mrs Osei-Asiamah to make the centre inclusive.

Mrs Awadzi said children learn a lot by imitating their peers, she therefore  urged the centre to also accept children who did not have special needs to help those with cerebral palsy model right behaviors.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Mother of four special needs children rescued from suicide attempt.



Mrs Golda Nunoo, Mother of four children, all special needs has been rescued from a suicide attempt by members of a support group she belongs to.

Golda and her three children
Mrs Nunoo made a frantic call to one of the members of the Special Mothers Group, Madam Linda Clarke amidst tears that someone in her neighborhood has been constantly ruining insults on her, referring to her as “Mother of mad children”

She thus decided to end it all for herself and three of the children currently living with her. When Madam Linda Clarke and Mrs Ellen Affam-Dadzie both members of the Special Mothers group, got to her house in Ashiaman, a suburb of Tema, she had locked two of the children in a room and had left to a church with the two year old son to say her last prayers to God.

Linda Clarke told the media that according to Golda, she has been shunned completely by people in the area.

Golda, 36 years, said: “No one talks to me, even if I am holding money to buy things people refuse to accept the money, they call me the curse one, saying I have given birth to mad children, I feel very isolated and want to move away from this neighbourhood.”

Mrs Hannah Awadzi, Initiator of the Special Mothers Project, an advocacy and awareness creation programme on cerebral palsy, said the project was introduced to Golda about two years ago when she gave birth to her last son with severe club foot.

“We tried to no avail to get the children into schools, even with a letter from the Ghana Education Service Special Education Unit, the children were refused admission,” Mrs Awadzi said.

Two years ago Ghana launched the Inclusive Education Policy supposed to ensure that all children go to school regardless of their disabilities; however, many parents of children with special needs think that the policy is not inclusive enough.

Majority of children with special needs in Ghana are refused admission even in government schools




Golda in tears
Golda spends the whole of her life attending to her four children, three of them non-verbal and is unable to work, her husband even though very supportive earns only 200 cedis a month as a security man.

Her first child has been adopted by her brother to lessen the burden on her 

Mrs Awadzi called on the Department of Social Welfare, non-governmental organizations, philanthropists and corporate organizations to come to the aid of Golda